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Apple Herb Beer

Posted on Sep 18, 2016 by in Beer, Fruit, Herbs, Malts & Grains, Safale S-04 | 0 comments

Chopped herbs

Labor Day is behind us and temps are dropping to the high 80s. It must be Fall in Southern California.

I’ve begun to work on my beers for the upcoming Holiday frenzy. I’ve started with a modified version of my Apple Sage beer. This is not even a 1 gallon beer recipe. I have been improvising with smaller batches to test ingredients that I haven’t used before. In this case I added chopped Mexican Tarragon from my balcony garden (more on that in a future post) and I also use malted grains in addition to Victory Malt to take it to another level.
apple-herb-beer-biab-mdiaz
I bottled this brew today and can safely say that this will be one fine beer for Thanksgiving Daze. I plan on making another batch soon if the weather ever gets below the 80s again.
Apple herb homebrew bottled

The herbs were added in a brew-in-a-bag along with the grains and mashed for about 45 minutes in 48 ounces of water.

I removed the BIAB, then added the sugar, DME, and limes and boiled for 20 minutes.

Then I added the apple juice, yeast nutrient and Irish Moss and boiled for another 15 minutes.

I used my “go-to” yeast, Safale 04.

After about a week of fermentation I transferred to a secondary fermenter with a little bit more crushed herbs and bottled 12 days later.

That’s how I did it.

Ingredients:

24 oz. Apple juice (fresh pressed or organic with no additives)
48 oz. water
9.7 oz. Jaggery sugar
1 lime sliced
1/4 cup crushed Vicory Malt
1/4 cup crushed 2-Row Malt
3 dry white sage leaves (chopped)
4-6 Mexican Tarragon leaves (fresh and chopped)
Dash of Yeast nutirient
Dash of Irish Moss
Dash of Licorice root
Maybe 1/4 package of Safale 04 beer yeast

Important note about White Sage. White sage is native to California and is a protected plant. It should not be foraged in the wild. Fortunately White Sage is very easy to grow and requires very little water. I have 2 plants growing on my balcony in containers.

I have shifted my perspective on foraging after learning more about the harmful effects it has on the environment and for the propagation of additional plants in the wild. Bees, and other wildlife depend on the fruits and flowers and if we take those it affects the entire ecosystem.

There are many nurseries that now carry Native California plants. I’ve come to the conclusion that we owe it to ourselves and the planet to plant more rather than just take what we want from the wild landscape as if we were in a grocery store.

I know that foraging is really popular now but think about it and act responsibly. You can do a lot by just going to the local Farmers Market, grocery stores or planting your own herbs.

Think about it.

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